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  • #31
    Originally posted by MarciD View Post
    And that won't overdose the cats in any way? I have no problems with doing it every 2 weeks but want to make sure I'm not going to cause any problems with the kitties.
    Nope. You are putting exactly the same amount of the active ingredient as you would with the full cat dose (except no Plus). The active ingredient is essentially nontoxic to mammals (it started as an agricultural product, we eat it on fruits and vegetables) so doing it every 2 weeks should cause no problems at all. Note that this recommendation came from the world's expert (not me!) on fleas, the person who is hired by the manufacturers to perform the safety and efficacy studies on prescription flea products (he's at Kansas State).
    Dr. Gus

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    • #32
      Marci,

      I treat mine every two months with Frontline Plus and I have no problems and mine do go outside. When Frontline first came out if I remember correctly it was an every two month product, then they changed to every month. I just continued the every two month and it works for me, your mileage may vary.

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      • #33
        Hi there,
        We also use Khakibos spray or powder. Khakibos/ Tagetes minuta is a very pungent smelling weed - most commonly found in Africa - and is known as a gentle, non-toxic, yet effective method of controlling fleas and ticks. It is relatively inexpensive and available online.
        Morag

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        • #34
          Originally posted by emmceetoo View Post
          Hi there,
          We also use Khakibos spray or powder. Khakibos/ Tagetes minuta is a very pungent smelling weed - most commonly found in Africa - and is known as a gentle, non-toxic, yet effective method of controlling fleas and ticks. It is relatively inexpensive and available online.
          Morag
          Just because something is "natural" doesn't mean it is nontoxic. Here is the toxicity info on the active ingredient of Tages Minuta:

          most important hazard(s) : Xn N - Harmful, Dangerous for the environment.
          R 10 - Flammable.
          R 36/37/38 - Irritating to eyes, respiratory system, and skin.
          R 42/43 - May cause sensitization by inhalation and skin contact.
          R 51/53 - Toxic to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment.
          R 65 - Harmful: may cause lung damage if swallowed.
          S 02 - Keep out of the reach of children.
          S 26 - In case of contact with eyes, rinse immediately with plenty of water and seek medical advice.
          S 36 - Wear suitable protective clothing.
          S 61 - Avoid release to the environment. Refer to special instructions/safety data sheet.
          S 62 - If swallowed, do not induce vomiting: seek medical advice immediately and show this container or label.
          Dr. Gus

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          • #35
            Hi there, thank you so much for the warning. I find it a bit disconcerting that I've been using something that could be potentially so harmful. Does the literature mention a "safe dosage" or would this product now be contra-indicated altogether? (The reason I ask is because the spray was initially recommended by our vet in South Africa to be used as an alternating product i.e. with Frontline, because the ticks & fleas appeared to develop a degree of immunity to one product.)

            Morag


            Originally posted by DrGus View Post
            Just because something is "natural" doesn't mean it is nontoxic. Here is the toxicity info on the active ingredient of Tages Minuta:

            most important hazard(s) : Xn N - Harmful, Dangerous for the environment.
            R 10 - Flammable.
            R 36/37/38 - Irritating to eyes, respiratory system, and skin.
            R 42/43 - May cause sensitization by inhalation and skin contact.
            R 51/53 - Toxic to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment.
            R 65 - Harmful: may cause lung damage if swallowed.
            S 02 - Keep out of the reach of children.
            S 26 - In case of contact with eyes, rinse immediately with plenty of water and seek medical advice.
            S 36 - Wear suitable protective clothing.
            S 61 - Avoid release to the environment. Refer to special instructions/safety data sheet.
            S 62 - If swallowed, do not induce vomiting: seek medical advice immediately and show this container or label.

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            • #36
              Keep in mind that everything is toxic in a high enough level. One must be extra cautious in cats because they absorb chemicals, natural and otherwise, through their skin much more readily than dogs or people.

              Oral Toxicity(LD50) :
              Oral-Rat 3700.00 mg/kg


              Dermal Toxicity(LD50) :
              Skin-Rabbit >5000.00 mg/kg


              Inhalation Toxicity(LC50) :
              Not determined

              limits in the finished product for - "leave on the skin contact" :
              0.0100 % Restriction.
              limits in the finished product for - "wash off the skin contact" :
              1.0000 % Recommendation.
              limits in the finished product for - "no skin contact" :
              2.0000 % Recommendation.
              recommendation for tagete oil egypt usage levels up to :
              1.0000 % in the fragrance concentrate.
              recommendation for tagete oil egypt usage levels up to :
              20.0000 ppm in the flavor

              Note that this is the limit for "leave on the skin contact" for humans, not cats.
              Dr. Gus

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              • #37
                I don't see anything here on treating the environment. When we had a bad infestation quite a while ago, I did this (all on the same day) on the recommendation of a friend:

                1)Start on a day you treat all the animals with a spot treatment from your vet (and for this to work you have to treat them all the same day), then do whatever you gotta to keep them out of the room you're working on
                2) clean any hard surfaces the animals can reach with soapy water, then spray with 1:30 bleach and let soak for 10 minutes, then wipe and rinse. (You might want to consider using paper towels for this job rather than rags or sponges.)
                3) Take any soft surfaces that can be laundered, and launder them. Use hot water and/or high heat in the dryer! The soapy water will probably kill the fleas but the eggs may survive.
                4) For all surfaces that cannot be laundered (furniture, carpet, etc) spray with boric acid powder. (It's sold as a roach-killing product in most grocery stores - look for the kind with the nozzle cap.) You don't need it piled up, you just want a solid thin layer. Then using a normal hard-bristled cleaning brush, brush the powder in. Leave it for an hour, then vaccum it up. Immediately empty the vaccum, and immediately take the trash out.
                Also, apply the powder to hard surfaces the eggs can reach but the animals can't (like under baseboards, and vaccum it out an hour later).
                5) Proceed to the next room until every room is done including hallways, garages, and any other indoor areas the animals have access to.

                Maintain the flea treatment on the animals per vet instructions, and repeat the cleaning and boric acid every two weeks for 8 weeks.

                As far as I'm aware, boric acid is not safe for pets or people, so keep the animals out, and wear gloves and a mask! It was suggested to me to use a stiff broom to brush the stuff into the carpet, but I found using a standard floor-scrubbing scrush to be easier on my body than trying to scrub the entire carpet with a broom. Also, when brushing it in, use different angles or circular motions, over the same area on things like carpeting. I would go vertically back and forth, then horizontally. On high traffic areas of carpeting, brush the carpet against the way it normally lies to fluff it up and get under the fibers.

                I know this sounds like a lot of work, but if you aren't thorough, it's all for naught as you'll just be reinfested, and it doesn't leave toxic fumes lingering for hours like sprays and foggers do, AND it doesn't necessitate taking everyone out of the house.
                Got pics of all the furkids up!

                Live for TODAY! You may not get a tomorrow!

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                • #38
                  My cats don't go outside, so I don't have a flea problem with them. But when I first got cats (seems like ages ago) I had problems. What I did was use a flea comb to get the numbers down. (They weren't much to begin with, thank goodness).

                  I then gave them Brewer's yeast tablets, which they loved. (Garlic is toxic to cats, but most cats won't eat enough garlic to become toxic. But pills are a different story, as they can't select the dose for themselves. That is why I would stay away from any garlic product).

                  I then set off several flea fog bombs, and it eliminated everything once and for all. Now, no cat gets into my house without making sure no fleas. It only meant keeping the cats out of the house for several hours after setting off the bombs.

                  The issue with boric acid on the rugs is that your cat will get it on their paws, and then lick it off their paws. So boric acid where the cat cannot access would be all right. It is not as if any odor is going to be a problem with them breathing it in.

                  A caution with bleach is that some cats find the scent of bleach irresistible, so you don't want your cat getting on any surface that has wet bleach solution on it. If I have a scent of bleach on my fingers, they will lick them endlessly even after I have thoroughly washed my hands.
                  sigpic

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by calicokitty View Post
                    My cats don't go outside, so I don't have a flea problem with them. But when I first got cats (seems like ages ago) I had problems. What I did was use a flea comb to get the numbers down. (They weren't much to begin with, thank goodness).

                    I then gave them Brewer's yeast tablets, which they loved. (Garlic is toxic to cats, but most cats won't eat enough garlic to become toxic. But pills are a different story, as they can't select the dose for themselves. That is why I would stay away from any garlic product).

                    I then set off several flea fog bombs, and it eliminated everything once and for all. Now, no cat gets into my house without making sure no fleas. It only meant keeping the cats out of the house for several hours after setting off the bombs.

                    The issue with boric acid on the rugs is that your cat will get it on their paws, and then lick it off their paws. So boric acid where the cat cannot access would be all right. It is not as if any odor is going to be a problem with them breathing it in.

                    A caution with bleach is that some cats find the scent of bleach irresistible, so you don't want your cat getting on any surface that has wet bleach solution on it. If I have a scent of bleach on my fingers, they will lick them endlessly even after I have thoroughly washed my hands.
                    Precious is also an indoor only cat but she still gets fleas. The reason is because I live in an apartment complex and some people here have dogs that go outside to use the restroom or to play. They bring fleas back into the building and then the fleas manage to spread to my apartment and get on Precious. I have noticed though that the fleas haven't been as much of a problem since it got cold.


                    I love my Precious kitty cat!

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                    • #40
                      Very interesting experience. I would like to suggest you that you may contact a right animal care doctor or consultant to make your pet animal's lie easy and comfortable.

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