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Raising Feral Kittens

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Elizabeth-Anne View Post

    Thank you Diane, is kitten chow the same as kibbles? I think we have different names for the same things I was actually wondering what to move them on to, once they are weaned. I do not have a lot of options for cat/kitten food here. We can sometimes get tinned cat food - Whiskas - and such like, but that is about it. Should I start them on tinned food, or are cat biscuits better? It's been a while since I've had small kittens, so I can't remember.
    Kitten food is specially formulated for kittens and contains different formulas for protein, etc. You can give either canned or kibbles. If you can get the kitten food in kibble form, you can leave it out all the time and let them free feed. If you canít get kitten food, the next best thing is to start them on regular kibble that is soaked and softened with kitten milk. I donít have experience with raising bottle babies, so hope someone here who has can weigh in. You could also try doing an online search on this topic.

    Diane and Cicero - Sr. Manager:

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    • #17
      Your ferals are a couple of cuties. I googled ďwhy is my cat scratching his faceĒ and found a few articles. Issues ranged from parasites to allergies to dental/facial pain. The parasite (fleas, etc.) sounded sort of like what you describe. Here are a couple of articles. I am not a vet but these may give you some ideas. Are there vet services available where you are?

      http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/why...ching-its-face

      http://www.catexpert.co.uk/cats/face...drome-in-cats/
      The Bee and me, Maggie Forever! (January 1988- June 19, 2010), Irving Always! (March 1987 - October 25, 1999) Vancouver, BC, Theo my big beautiful boy. July 27, 2010-April 3, 2017

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      • #18
        Originally posted by MW&MW View Post
        Your ferals are a couple of cuties. I googled ďwhy is my cat scratching his faceĒ and found a few articles. Issues ranged from parasites to allergies to dental/facial pain. The parasite (fleas, etc.) sounded sort of like what you describe. Here are a couple of articles. I am not a vet but these may give you some ideas. Are there vet services available where you are?

        http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/why...ching-its-face

        http://www.catexpert.co.uk/cats/face...drome-in-cats/

        Thanks so much for these articles, Iíll check them out now - I donít see fleas on them, but you never know.

        Yesterday I spoke to a local wildlife vet (she is currently raising a baby elephant, probably not something you experience much on this forum ).

        She gave me a suggestion which, so far so good, has worked: do NOT hold them when feeding. Make a Ďmother catí out of a rolled up towel and then feed them so they are on the towel/standing up against it and let them knead the towel.

        Well, they are not kneading the towel, but in this free-standing position, they are clawing the air but not their faces. Milk is going all over the place and itís messy, but no scratching thank goodness
        Ď

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        • #19
          Originally posted by DianeP View Post

          Kitten food is specially formulated for kittens and contains different formulas for protein, etc. You can give either canned or kibbles. If you can get the kitten food in kibble form, you can leave it out all the time and let them free feed. If you canít get kitten food, the next best thing is to start them on regular kibble that is soaked and softened with kitten milk. I donít have experience with raising bottle babies, so hope someone here who has can weigh in. You could also try doing an online search on this topic.
          Thanks so much for the clarification. Unfortunately kitten food - specifically kitten food - is not something we get here. I would have to get shipped over from the UK, not very practical. We do get cat biscuits, the Whiskas variety, and I found some that are for cats of 1 year and older, nothing younger. I will use that and, as you say, soak it in their kitten milk.

          They are in such good form, dear little people they are. Funnily enough, I think itís the girl who is the stronger, more confident of the two; the little boy is smaller and not as outgoing. Itís interesting to see their characters start to develop. My other cats are not remotely interested, except for my orange boy - Norman Monduli - who hisses and spits at them, but that is to be expected as he is very much Ďthe apple of his motherís eye/first born/spoilt little childí. I expect it will settle in time.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Elizabeth-Anne View Post


            Thanks so much for these articles, Iíll check them out now - I donít see fleas on them, but you never know.

            Yesterday I spoke to a local wildlife vet (she is currently raising a baby elephant, probably not something you experience much on this forum ).

            She gave me a suggestion which, so far so good, has worked: do NOT hold them when feeding. Make a Ďmother catí out of a rolled up towel and then feed them so they are on the towel/standing up against it and let them knead the towel.

            Well, they are not kneading the towel, but in this free-standing position, they are clawing the air but not their faces. Milk is going all over the place and itís messy, but no scratching thank goodness
            Ď
            That is good news. I like the towel idea. Everyone needs a mother.
            The Bee and me, Maggie Forever! (January 1988- June 19, 2010), Irving Always! (March 1987 - October 25, 1999) Vancouver, BC, Theo my big beautiful boy. July 27, 2010-April 3, 2017

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            • #21
              Interesting about the towel. We'll have to remember that for future such situations.
              Karen A/Publicist

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Elizabeth-Anne View Post


                Thanks so much for these articles, Iíll check them out now - I donít see fleas on them, but you never know.

                Yesterday I spoke to a local wildlife vet (she is currently raising a baby elephant, probably not something you experience much on this forum ).

                She gave me a suggestion which, so far so good, has worked: do NOT hold them when feeding. Make a Ďmother catí out of a rolled up towel and then feed them so they are on the towel/standing up against it and let them knead the towel.

                Well, they are not kneading the towel, but in this free-standing position, they are clawing the air but not their faces. Milk is going all over the place and itís messy, but no scratching thank goodness
                Ď
                No, not too many baby elephants here, but a vet is a vet, so Iím glad you could talk to one! The towel is a good idea, in spite of the mess. Theyíl likely grow out of this once they are weaned. Youíll have to be careful they donít start playing with your hands as they get older.
                Diane and Cicero - Sr. Manager:

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                • #23
                  Hi all, the rolled-up towel is continuing to work really well. There has been no more scratching of the face. We still make a bit of a mess and sometimes they are like little spiders, all over the towel, but so far so good

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Elizabeth-Anne View Post
                    Hi all, the rolled-up towel is continuing to work really well. There has been no more scratching of the face. We still make a bit of a mess and sometimes they are like little spiders, all over the towel, but so far so good
                    Great news! Keep us posted on how theyíre doing!
                    Diane and Cicero - Sr. Manager:

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                    • #25
                      I've raised many, many feral kittens. What I've always done is using a stuffed toy for them to be with and then feed them using the same stuffed toy. The rolled towel will also work. I've had a few that would get so anxious for their bottle that they would scratch themselves and me but not very often.
                      Marci DeLisle
                      Cats/Rescue, Feral and Stray
                      Camp Counselor at Camp Happy Cat
                      Owner of NW Critter Sitter - "Paws-itively Purr-fect Pet-sitting"
                      Owner of Northwind Reiki ~Animal Reiki for the fur-persons in your life!
                      www.nwcrittersitter.com

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                      • #26
                        F1609F82-DEFE-47E0-A949-5A8CF5F4E2E7.jpeg Sweetest little puddies today. Still slightly scratched faces, but old now. Since the towel and my not holding them at all whilst feeding, they are totally fine. They have now left the dog basket, and their hot water bottle, and are exploring the TV room, rolling around play-fighting and chasing their tails. Heaven

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by MarciD View Post
                          I've raised many, many feral kittens. What I've always done is using a stuffed toy for them to be with and then feed them using the same stuffed toy. The rolled towel will also work. I've had a few that would get so anxious for their bottle that they would scratch themselves and me but not very often.
                          Marci, I can see how a stuffed toy would also work so well The rolled towel has definitely worked. I put the hot water bottle right up against it, then the old sweatshirt up against it and itís all now so familiar to them.

                          Iíve sort of worked out that they were approx 10 days old when my husband was given them (eyes still closed, opened during the day) which was the 4th April; this would now make them just over 3 weeks old I think.

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                          • #28
                            What cuties!

                            I have raised a few bottle babies, and they are so much fun. At four weeks, they are old enough for tinned food. If you don't have kitten food, just give them regular cat food, mixed with some kitten milk.

                            Interestingly, I found it much easier to teach the babies to use the litter box than to teach them to eat. I had to essentially stick my finger in the food, then stick my finger with the food in their mouths, then put their mouths on the plate, and it took a few days. Some learned faster than others.

                            They can also use the litter box at four weeks, but you might need several small boxes. I used old shoeboxes at first and just threw them out when they got wet.

                            Teresa
                            Living on the Cheap
                            Miami FL on the Cheap
                            Florida on the Cheap

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Elizabeth-Anne View Post
                              F1609F82-DEFE-47E0-A949-5A8CF5F4E2E7.jpeg Sweetest little puddies today. Still slightly scratched faces, but old now. Since the towel and my not holding them at all whilst feeding, they are totally fine. They have now left the dog basket, and their hot water bottle, and are exploring the TV room, rolling around play-fighting and chasing their tails. Heaven
                              Adorable! Youíre doing such a great job with them!
                              Diane and Cicero - Sr. Manager:

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                              • #30
                                Those are two adorable kittens. Glad the towel method is working.
                                sigpic

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