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  • Animal Shelter Makes Great Adoption Ad

    http://www.boredpanda.com/funny-cats...nimal-shelter/
    Karen A/Publicist

  • #2
    Oh that's so funny. Great commercial. Years ago I was part of a group that did videos of animals in the local shelter every 2 weeks. It was a lot of work filming and then the fellow who did the video cuts and putting it together took maybe a day or more to complete it. Looking at all the cuts, this probably took quite a bit of time to piece it all together. It's fabulous, though. And the guy is so funny!

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    • #3
      Originally posted by LindaD View Post
      Oh that's so funny. Great commercial. Years ago I was part of a group that did videos of animals in the local shelter every 2 weeks. It was a lot of work filming and then the fellow who did the video cuts and putting it together took maybe a day or more to complete it. Looking at all the cuts, this probably took quite a bit of time to piece it all together. It's fabulous, though. And the guy is so funny!
      Apparently apart from this video he is all business
      Karen A/Publicist

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      • #4
        Aww, that was cute.
        Jill Gallo /Manager
        The Petsforums Management Team

        My Albums

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        • #5
          That was really cute. Was that Brad Pitt in the starring role?
          The Bee and me, Maggie Forever! (January 1988- June 19, 2010), Irving Always! (March 1987 - October 25, 1999) Vancouver, BC, Theo my big beautiful boy. July 27, 2010-April 3, 2017

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          • #6
            It's being shared on Facebook too.
            "Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea." - Robert A. Heinlein

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            • #7
              That's hilarious.
              In related news, the former pit of depravity local shelter, now under control of a whole new organization, adopted out 300 cats and dogs in the last quarter. Candace brought a kitten for Pet of the Week. Kitten can't go home until she has her second shots and spay, but they were taking applications for her because she has an unusual distinction:
              She's the last cat at the shelter.
              Kitten season will start shortly, but even that has been cut drastically because of the new low-cost spay/neuter clinic. Most adoptions now are adult animals who have lost their homes, not unwanted litters.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BeckyMorgan View Post
                That's hilarious.
                In related news, the former pit of depravity local shelter, now under control of a whole new organization, adopted out 300 cats and dogs in the last quarter. Candace brought a kitten for Pet of the Week. Kitten can't go home until she has her second shots and spay, but they were taking applications for her because she has an unusual distinction:
                She's the last cat at the shelter.
                Kitten season will start shortly, but even that has been cut drastically because of the new low-cost spay/neuter clinic. Most adoptions now are adult animals who have lost their homes, not unwanted litters.
                Becky that is wonderful! What a turnaround!
                Karen A/Publicist

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by BeckyMorgan View Post
                  That's hilarious.
                  In related news, the former pit of depravity local shelter, now under control of a whole new organization, adopted out 300 cats and dogs in the last quarter. Candace brought a kitten for Pet of the Week. Kitten can't go home until she has her second shots and spay, but they were taking applications for her because she has an unusual distinction:
                  She's the last cat at the shelter.
                  Kitten season will start shortly, but even that has been cut drastically because of the new low-cost spay/neuter clinic. Most adoptions now are adult animals who have lost their homes, not unwanted litters.
                  Wow, that's remarkable progress!
                  Diane and Cicero - Sr. Manager:

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                  • #10
                    There were some arrests and a lot of quiet "resign and we won't prosecute" moments, but the job got done. Belmont County is now an official No Kill Nation shelter. Marshall County still puts down all feral cats, so that's not good yet, but we're all working on them.

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                    • #11
                      [QUOTE=BeckyMorgan;n531999]There were some arrests and a lot of quiet "resign and we won't prosecute" moments, but the job got done. Belmont County is now an official No Kill Nation shelter. Marshall County still puts down all feral cats, so that's not good yet, but we're all working on them.[/QUOTE

                      Keep up the good work, BeckyMorgan!!

                      Karen A/Publicist

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                      • #12
                        I didn't do the catching, I just kept telling everyone I knew about it. The hero was a Pittsburgh doctor who asked about a dog, drove down to see her and was told the dog was gone because the shelter director had decided she didn't have enough money (by looking at her.) Doctor drove around the facility, saw the dogs out in the mud chained to their houses--many of them had been seized for just such conditions--and Doctor called the ASPCA. The shelter director reportedly was about to put down the dog when the raid hit, probably so she could hide the body and claim dog wasn't there.

                        At first the ASPCA was going to retrain the other staff, but after a brief attempt they sent everyone off and used some of the people who had been trying to volunteer for years. I don't know what-all happened out there, but it was seriously not good. There was a lot of parvo because of the mud, there was no isolation area...interestingly enough, shortly after the initial raid a major water leak in the office destroyed years of files, so no one knows where a lot of animals went.

                        Now there's a big sunny cat room, the dogs have concrete-floored kennels with roofed outdoor runs, the inmates from the prison next door do obedience training and clean up, and the Marysville women's prison wood shop builds doghouses. They have their own surgery suite and a visiting vet who does low-cost spay/neuter and doesn't care about the vet association's blacklist. It's nowhere near the same place.

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                        • #13
                          That's some story about the dog almost destroyed to keep the Doctor away. Good thing the ASPCA rescued the shelter and the poor animals sorta housed there. I'm always glad for a feel good ending.
                          Karen A/Publicist

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by BeckyMorgan View Post
                            I didn't do the catching, I just kept telling everyone I knew about it. The hero was a Pittsburgh doctor who asked about a dog, drove down to see her and was told the dog was gone because the shelter director had decided she didn't have enough money (by looking at her.) Doctor drove around the facility, saw the dogs out in the mud chained to their houses--many of them had been seized for just such conditions--and Doctor called the ASPCA. The shelter director reportedly was about to put down the dog when the raid hit, probably so she could hide the body and claim dog wasn't there.

                            At first the ASPCA was going to retrain the other staff, but after a brief attempt they sent everyone off and used some of the people who had been trying to volunteer for years. I don't know what-all happened out there, but it was seriously not good. There was a lot of parvo because of the mud, there was no isolation area...interestingly enough, shortly after the initial raid a major water leak in the office destroyed years of files, so no one knows where a lot of animals went.

                            Now there's a big sunny cat room, the dogs have concrete-floored kennels with roofed outdoor runs, the inmates from the prison next door do obedience training and clean up, and the Marysville women's prison wood shop builds doghouses. They have their own surgery suite and a visiting vet who does low-cost spay/neuter and doesn't care about the vet association's blacklist. It's nowhere near the same place.
                            Sounds like a success story. The original woman sounds horrible. Lie about a dog? Why not just let the doctor have the dog?
                            Jill Gallo /Manager
                            The Petsforums Management Team

                            My Albums

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                            • #15
                              I didn't see this until just now. No one is sure, but everyone strongly suspects it was because the doctor is Black. It could have been any number of other things, but if so, it was a happy coincidence that got the ASPCA to listen and raid.

                              Bet that was interesting. Kick and kill raids had been her stock in trade to make people shut up. "We went into that house and they had six cats in deplorable condition, no, we can't show you, they were so bad we had to put them all down immediately and bury them in an undisclosed location..." All at once they had cops running into the shelter. They didn't get all the records because of the "water damage" and the "fire" but they got enough. The grand jury indictment was sealed, so no one will know exactly what happened. The director was way past usual retirement age and they let her plea bargain.

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