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No parrot, no surgery

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  • No parrot, no surgery

    That ended quickly. Some serious cardiology issues came up and they will have to be sorted out and that kills my window of opportunity of having the work done. The surgeon is not willing to risk my dying on the operating table, and I am not willing to risk that either.
    sigpic

  • #2
    So sorry to see that! Please take care of yourself....you wouldn’t think that someone who rides the bike as much as you do would have cardiac issues, but thank goodness for pre-op physicals.
    Diane and Cicero - Sr. Manager:

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    • #3
      It is sensible to delay until issues are resolved, particularly cardiac ones.
      Karen A/Publicist

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      • #4
        Originally posted by DianeP View Post
        So sorry to see that! Please take care of yourself....you wouldn’t think that someone who rides the bike as much as you do would have cardiac issues, but thank goodness for pre-op physicals.
        Probably a 'warranty' issue. LOL What is involved here is the possibility of an aortic aneurysm. I had a clinical diagnosis of one in 2014, and they spent 2 years to prove I didn't have one, including a CAT scan. To follow up a different issue from the CAT scan, I was able to get a new one in October 2018, and it turns out to be nothing. But the pulmonologist pointed out a problem area, which I just found out about last week. My family doctor didn't detect any problems, and my cardiac parameters are great. So it comes down to did I really have one in 2014, and was it wrongly reported as negative in 2016, which is a great concern of the surgeon. Or was none really present in 2016 but is now in 2018, which becomes a concern. The pulmonologist didn't feel it was an emergency. So now I am looking at a whole series of tests to define if I have one, and if I do, the extent of it. If I have one, I probably am at very low risk, but major elective surgery is not something to risk. This was flagged on the anesthesiology pre-screen.
        sigpic

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        • #5
          Originally posted by calicokitty View Post

          Probably a 'warranty' issue. LOL What is involved here is the possibility of an aortic aneurysm. I had a clinical diagnosis of one in 2014, and they spent 2 years to prove I didn't have one, including a CAT scan. To follow up a different issue from the CAT scan, I was able to get a new one in October 2018, and it turns out to be nothing. But the pulmonologist pointed out a problem area, which I just found out about last week. My family doctor didn't detect any problems, and my cardiac parameters are great. So it comes down to did I really have one in 2014, and was it wrongly reported as negative in 2016, which is a great concern of the surgeon. Or was none really present in 2016 but is now in 2018, which becomes a concern. The pulmonologist didn't feel it was an emergency. So now I am looking at a whole series of tests to define if I have one, and if I do, the extent of it. If I have one, I probably am at very low risk, but major elective surgery is not something to risk. This was flagged on the anesthesiology pre-screen.
          Sounds like a lot of fun...good luck. Hope everything shows negstive!
          Diane and Cicero - Sr. Manager:

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          • #6
            Originally posted by calicokitty View Post
            That ended quickly. Some serious cardiology issues came up and they will have to be sorted out and that kills my window of opportunity of having the work done. The surgeon is not willing to risk my dying on the operating table, and I am not willing to risk that either.
            Good new is these are quite fixable if you catch them. Worth the inconvenience.
            The Bee and me, Maggie Forever! (January 1988- June 19, 2010), Irving Always! (March 1987 - October 25, 1999) Vancouver, BC, Theo my big beautiful boy. July 27, 2010-April 3, 2017

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            • #7
              I got a call from a company telling me they were coming out Friday afternoon to assess and help me with my physical therapy. They hadn't gotten the message that it fell through. Also, they called when there was no assurance I would have been home at that time, since discharge from the hospital is not on a rigid schedule. This is part of what irked me about the whole process. They may know what they intend to do, but I don't. I got an on-line therapy program from the surgeon that was quite comprehensive, and figured that was it unless I came in for more. Had the surgery gone through, they would be coming out at the same time I was scheduled to pay for assistance from a home health care company, and that isn't cheap. They seem to be disconnected from reality. How can I know what they intend to do if they don't tell me in advance? I kept asking in advance and was met with silence. As a scientist, I am used to sketching out things in advance to be able to better prepare. They gave me nothing to sketch. At least now, when I am able to reschedule I will have a better understanding of what can happen. For instance, at the hospital, they have an orthopedic wing, and the room is yours while you are there. You start there and you end there. And it is a private room.
              sigpic

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              • #8
                calico -- sorry your surgery got cancelled and hope that you can get things sorted out quickly. It is not a minor issue to have an AA. A friend (from the Farmer's Market in town) who worked hard all the time on the farm, went in for a minor surgery a few weeks ago. He was anesthetized and before they could start the procedure, he had an AA burst. The cardiac team on site for emergencies was called but they could do nothing and he died. It's something that is devastating when it bursts but can be repaired if found early. Hope it gets all worked out.

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