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How far can a Pomeranian walk

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  • How far can a Pomeranian walk

    Can a Pomeranian go for a 2-3 mile walk? (on it's own 4 paws, not in a backpack) :-) I've only owned Keeshonds and am thinking about a Pomeranian. Being able to go for 45 to 60 minute walks each night is important to me (Keeps the weight off). Thanks.

  • #2
    Originally posted by feldmakg
    Can a Pomeranian go for a 2-3 mile walk? (on it's own 4 paws, not in a backpack) :-) I've only owned Keeshonds and am thinking about a Pomeranian. Being able to go for 45 to 60 minute walks each night is important to me (Keeps the weight off). Thanks.

    They probably could. Poms are fairly energetic, but they are quite hairy so you'd have to be careful if you live in a warm climate. You may want to contact a breeder just to be sure.

    Now, for an energetic, small dog, how about a Jack Russell? I've met a few and they're definatetly not couch potatoes.
    Jill Gallo /Manager
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    • #3
      Probably. Just be prepared to work your way up to the distance - poms aren't known for being super energetic, but I doubt they will have too much trouble with it, once you get the dog used to it.

      -Mary
      -------------------------------- Mary with Sadie , Elsie , Peaches & James

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      • #4
        You'd need to talk to a Pom owner or breeder to see what they say. It probably depends on a number of factors... dog's fitness, age (puppies shouldn't be walking long distances, until they're at least two years old & bones & joints have matured), and also depends on how you work up to that distance.

        Keep in mind that they probably can't handle the chemicals on the roads if it is winter & people are putting salt on the roads & sidewalks.
        Kim Laird,Senior Manager
        The Pets Forums Management Team

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        • #5
          This is a difficult question because it usually isn't a matter of the pom not wanting to go with you but one of concern over the strain it might place on him. Comparing the length of the average human stride to that of a little pom it's readily apparent that he must take about 4 steps to every 1 of ours. That means he effectively walks 2 miles to every one of ours and that could be hard on any one. Add to that burden his heavy coat & warm weather conditions and it becomes a no-win situation for the little guy. In my opinion a young healthy pom could easily walk 1 mile with you but should probably ride back in a back or belly pack.
          While the pom is an active little fellow he certainly won't fit into the "high energy" category although he'll give it his best shot if that's what you want. One of my poms would play ball until my arm totally gave out but he kinda cheated. He'd run to grab the ball then lay down & chew on it for a few minutes before bringing it back to be thrown again. The little character was sneaking a break!

          My last two dogs were both Schipperkes and they were charter members of the High Energy group. They could easily run a mile then look back as if to ask what's taking you so long? For the average healthy Schip a 3 mile walk is a romp in the park! :-)
          Marg Little, Senior Manager
          The Pets Forums Management Team

          "She was not quite what you would call refined. She was not quite what you would call unrefined. She was the kind of person that keeps a parrot."
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          • #6
            Thanks, Marg. I didn't want to pour cold water on the idea, and I really wasn't sure. But I didn't think the Poms were really a long-distance walking kind of breed. I'm trying to think of the other breeds that are also not long-distance walkers.... Pugs? Chihuahuas? Those sort of dogs. Even the Toy poodles aren't the kind of long walkers someone with a Kees or a Golden Retriever may be used to.

            I think. (g)
            Kim Laird,Senior Manager
            The Pets Forums Management Team

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            • #7
              Kimj, I think it pretty much boils down to what a particular dog was bred to do. For instance poms & pekes were never meant to run the marathon, their purpose was/is to be our companions - iow lap dogs. They're just not built for heavy exertion.

              Other breeds such as spaniels & schips were meant to work and, imho, they have much more endurance for the long haul. I suppose one indicator would be leg length but even that isn't always reliable, some schips have very short legs but it doesn't slow 'em down one bit <g>

              You know I just realized that I have no idea what the chihuahua was originally bred to do. Do you know?
              Marg Little, Senior Manager
              The Pets Forums Management Team

              "She was not quite what you would call refined. She was not quite what you would call unrefined. She was the kind of person that keeps a parrot."
              - Mark Twain

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              • #8
                Originally posted by kimj
                Thanks, Marg. I didn't want to pour cold water on the idea, and I really wasn't sure. But I didn't think the Poms were really a long-distance walking kind of breed. I'm trying to think of the other breeds that are also not long-distance walkers.... Pugs? Chihuahuas? Those sort of dogs. Even the Toy poodles aren't the kind of long walkers someone with a Kees or a Golden Retriever may be used to.

                I think. (g)
                Yeah, thinking about it, I can't recall if poms are supposed to be a breed with a shorter muzzle, such as pugs, or if they are supposed to have more normal noses. From a quick glance at the standard on the AKC's website, it looks like I'm getting them confused with pekinese, who DO have the squished noses like pugs. But a pom would not have the breathing problems associated with the shorter faces like a pug would, so they would probably do ok as long as they don't expect the dog to go the full distance right away. At least the dog should be light enough to carry back if it gets too tired!!

                And if it helps any - I've seen some pugs that were both totally incapable of doing such walking, and some that would probably be raring to go!! Not a lot, but I have seen it - there's a guy who does agility with his pug at the place I take the girls for classes. That little dog really gives his human a good workout!! But that seems to be an unusual pug!

                -Mary
                -------------------------------- Mary with Sadie , Elsie , Peaches & James

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                • #9
                  Marg,

                  Chis were street dogs, if I recall rightly. I'm not looking it up in the AKC book of breeds, but they were imported from Mexico originally & I think they are just little, undersized, and rather coatless dogs that came off the street.

                  And obviously, a small dog without much coat does better in that heat than a larger dog. Does better on less food too. They're survivors.

                  I don't think the Giant breeds are any longer bred to be long term working dogs, with lots of stamina. But perhaps I'm wrong... I know the Newfoundlands participate in water trials, etc. and are good rescue dogs still. But I still wouldn't run a Newfie a long distance.
                  Kim Laird,Senior Manager
                  The Pets Forums Management Team

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