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  • duck weed

    I have a large koi pond in my yard and strangely enough, could even say bizarrely enough, love duck weed. It is not for sale anywhere as it is considered a nuisance. Personally, I think it is lovely and truly want some for this particular pond. If the fish destroy it, I will move some to the front yard pond which is fish free. Then I will always have a source of duckweed for my koi pond. Does anyone know where I can get some of this menace to society?misc 003b.jpg
    Lois and the furbrats

  • #2
    I'd love to ship you some from our open spaces! It's about throttled our ponds here. It is pretty though, and it usually dies back seasonally.
    Diane and Cicero - Sr. Manager:

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    • #3
      If, in the spring, you would send me some (much) I would be ever so grateful and, of course, would cover any and all expenses. ♥ duckweed!!!!
      Lois and the furbrats

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      • #4
        Originally posted by lois View Post
        If, in the spring, you would send me some (much) I would be ever so grateful and, of course, would cover any and all expenses. ♥ duckweed!!!!
        I don't know if it's legal to ship duckweed <GGG>
        Diane and Cicero - Sr. Manager:

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        • #5
          well, if you are willing, I will find out Delaware's laws about duckweed.
          Lois and the furbrats

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          • #6
            It is Wolfia, a tiny species of floating water plant called duck meal, that is illegal to ship. Duck meal grows so completely over the surface of a pond that it blocks off oxygen to the pond, killing all the fish and submerged vegetation.

            Ivy or star duckweed, Lemna trisulca, is also another no no in many states since it has hooks that link each plant to the others around it, making it a pest to navigation, by clogging the propeller. Lemna trisulca is Delaware's native duckweed, hardy to Climate Zone 1. The Christina, Delaware's largest river, is often turned green in slow current areas by star duckweed.

            Lemna minor is a favorite of aquarists who like a plant that grows quickly and purifies the water of nitrogenous fish wastes. It can be difficult to control in the aquarium since it's hard to be sure you have removed every single plant from an aquarium. It is the best species of duck weed to feed to koi and goldfish and in human foods. It is very healthy for goldfish and koi to eat it since it prevents and can even cure the early stages of "swim bladder disease" which is an intestinal problem that traps gas in the digestive system. In traditional Chinese medicine, it is regarded as a cure for human hypothermia, kidney infections, and flatulence. Wash and then puree the duckweed and then add it to soups. You may find you actually like it in broccoli cheese soup or in onion soup. As far as flatulence it does work and would seem to be more natural than something like Bean-No.

            Several other duckweed and related species are less prone to koi predation and more attractive either because they are larger, frilly, or have red roots and visible flowers. Lemna major, giant duckweed, is simply larger than L. minor and koi will eat it but if it is mixed with L minor they are likely to pick out every leaf of L. minor and eat it first. Azolla caroliensis is like a lace doily version of duckweed. In the fall it turns a brownish purple but can't survive year round outdoors much farther north of its native states, the Carolinas. Red root floater, Phyllanthus fluitans, is slightly larger than giant duck weed and although all duck weeds are flowering plants, red root floater has small but very obvious white flowers with yellow centers. It is more demanding than other duck weeds because it needs brighter light and fertilization. Salvinia spp. are sometimes called fuzzy duck weed since they are all hairy. Frogbit is bigger than giant duck weed, but it would hve to be a very small frog that could use it for a lily pad to sit on.

            You can order L minor from many koi and goldfish suppliers. I know of one that ships duck weed year round for use as a goldfish food. http://www.tricker.com/prod-p-liveduckweed

            You can also find duckweed as just one choice in a litany of floating plants, from Asian water grass, to sensitive plant, to Neptune's crown, and more. Most of them do quite well in the pond in the warm season, and others are most often kept indoors in an aquarium year round. You may find them on eBay or on Aquabid.com http://www.aquabid.com/cgi-bin/aucti...gi?liveplantsf
            Last edited by Rhodophyta; 11-27-2011, 01:25 AM.

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            • #7
              Thanks for the info -- I figured as invasive as it is, it wouldn't be legal to ship it!
              Diane and Cicero - Sr. Manager:

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              • #8
                Thank you so much for all the information!!!!! I will certainly check out these sites since I have wanted it for years. There are areas here where it grows in the very large drainage ditches but I'm not about to go into any of them because I don't know what would come along with it, plus there is the added disadvantage of encountering 2 of my least favorite creatures, one being the snapping turtle, the second being the water moccassin, both very much aggressive. I don't think I want to encounter either of them let alone both of them together defending their turf.
                Lois and the furbrats

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                • #9
                  TY Diane, I consider you a very lucky person, all that duckweed!!!! I will check out the sites listed by Rhodophyta and with luck will have my very own duck weed next spring!!!!
                  Lois and the furbrats

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                  • #10
                    duckweed is rich in protein. I culture duckweed to feed my kois and goldfishes also they are excellent natural filter media. I add some on my planted filter chamber

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                    • #11
                      I never heard of duckweed until today - what a great source of information our group is!!
                      Karen A/Publicist

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