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Thread: Wysong: Healthy Cat Food?

  1. #1
    OriJa
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    Default Wysong: Healthy Cat Food?

    I've been (painfully) searching for a healthy, holistic cat food that my cat will actually eat. I don't want by-products and fillers and junk. I bought some Castor & Pollux UltraMix - it sounds VERY healthy, but she doesn't like it. She was eating just enough to get by and she's lost quite a bit of weight (which is actually a good thing because she was overweight, but I don't want her losing too much too fast). So, today I bought Wysong Geriatrix (my cat is almost 13), and she seems to like it a lot. My question is: Has anyone here tried this cat food (well, not them personally, but I mean their cats - LOL) and what was your experience with it? Did your cat like it? Do you think it's a healthy choice? Please let me know what you think. Here's the profile and ingredients:

    Specifically designed to fulfill the nutritional needs of aging cats requiring fewer calories than more active adult cats. Lower caloric density and higher food bulk help reduce the glycemic index and lower the body's weight set point of older cats. Such underfeeding with a micro-nutrient dense diet the design of Geriatrx™ has been demonstrated to extend the life-span in a variety of species. Geriatrx™ is also designed for use with degenerative disorders such as kidney, heart, and liver disease which perhaps require lower levels of sodium, higher quality protein sources, and increased micronutrient density.

    Analysis: Protein 32%, Fat 15.5%, Fiber7%, Moisture 12%

    Ingredients: Chicken, Chicken Giblets, Poultry Fat (preserved with mixed Tocopherols as a source of vitamin E), Ground Brown Rice, Ground Wheat, Ground Corn, Ground Oat Groats, Fish Oil, Salt, DL-Methionine, Taurine, Eggs, Plums, Dried Wheat Grass Powder, Dried Barley Grass Powder, Whey, Dried Yogurt, Lecithin, Citric Acid, Natural Extractives of Sage, Natural Extractives of Rosemary, Dried Kelp, Garlic, Black Pepper, Artichoke, Dried Bacillus subtilis Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus casei Fermentation Product, Dried Lactobacillus lactis Fermentation Product, Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus niger Fermentation Product, Dried Aspergillus oryzae Fermentation Product, Ascorbic Acid, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Mountain-mama's Avatar
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    Here is one food I have had very good luck with. I noticed a decrease in the vomiting that cats seem so fond of and their coats are really silky and shiny.

    http://www.bluebuff.com/why-blue/hea...ilosophy.shtml
    Janice

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  3. #3
    Senior Member Teresa's Avatar
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    I use Wellness wet and dry, partly because they sell it at a Pet Supermarket near me. I also wanted to avoid gluten and byproducts. The one I use is higher in protein and lower in fat, but my cats are younger.

    My cats are enthusiastic about the wet food (and I am giving them wet food more often) and accepting of the dry. They'll eat it but they don't overeat it.

    Teresa

  4. #4
    OriJa
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    In order for Orion to get the best variety in her diet, I chose two different natural, holistic foods: Wysong Geriatrix and Innova Evo Ancestral Diet. Very happy with both, as they are very healthy, no fillers, junk or by-products. And Innova Evo is completely grain-free (no corn, rice, wheat, oats, etc.) and emulates the cat's wild diet of high protein with very little fruits and veggies (which they ingest when they eat prey that eat these foods). Plus, I feed her canned food twice a week. I figure by alternating Wysong and Innova dry foods (and a little canned food), she'll be getting the best of all worlds.

    I disgusts me how many people are STILL feeding their pets foods like Iams and Science Diet, which are "veterinarian recommended" and chock full of JUNK.

    Anyway, I hope you and your furry friends are doing well and healthy.

  5. #5
    Senior Member calicokitty's Avatar
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    The last I knew, mice ate primarily seeds and grains, so when the cat eats the stomach and intestinal tract of a mouse they catch, they are eating grains. And while many birds eat insects, there are plenty that eat seeds, and some eat fruits (berries). And cats catch and eat birds.

    And when we eat chicken, we select the portions we eat. That is not what a cat will do when they catch a bird. In fact, some of the parts that they go after first, are not parts we would ever eat.

    However, if your cats will not eat the food you have selected as the 'finest' food for them, there isn't much you can do.

  6. #6
    Staff DianeP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OriJa View Post
    In order for Orion to get the best variety in her diet, I chose two different natural, holistic foods: Wysong Geriatrix and Innova Evo Ancestral Diet. Very happy with both, as they are very healthy, no fillers, junk or by-products. And Innova Evo is completely grain-free (no corn, rice, wheat, oats, etc.) and emulates the cat's wild diet of high protein with very little fruits and veggies (which they ingest when they eat prey that eat these foods). Plus, I feed her canned food twice a week. I figure by alternating Wysong and Innova dry foods (and a little canned food), she'll be getting the best of all worlds.

    I disgusts me how many people are STILL feeding their pets foods like Iams and Science Diet, which are "veterinarian recommended" and chock full of JUNK.

    Anyway, I hope you and your furry friends are doing well and healthy.
    I'm glad you've found something healthy that your furkids like!
    Diane and Cicero - Sr. Manager
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  7. #7
    OriJa
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    Quote Originally Posted by calicokitty View Post
    The last I knew, mice ate primarily seeds and grains, so when the cat eats the stomach and intestinal tract of a mouse they catch, they are eating grains. And while many birds eat insects, there are plenty that eat seeds, and some eat fruits (berries). And cats catch and eat birds.

    And when we eat chicken, we select the portions we eat. That is not what a cat will do when they catch a bird. In fact, some of the parts that they go after first, are not parts we would ever eat.

    However, if your cats will not eat the food you have selected as the 'finest' food for them, there isn't much you can do.
    Exactly. And that's why it's important for a cat to have a high protein diet with a LITTLE grains and fruits and veggies. Keyword: Little. Most pet foods on the market have WAY too much of these ingredients and not enough protein. Not to mention all the fillers, wheat, corn, gluten, and by-products. If there's one thing I've learned in all my research, it's this: If the ingredients doesn't list some type of REAL animal protein (not "meal" or "by-product) as the first ingredient, move on. Also: More often than not, even if the food DOES list animal protein as the first ingredient, what comes next - second, third, fourth and fifth ingredients? Yep, you guessed it! Corn, rice, wheat, oats, etc. Cats (and dogs, too, for that matter) do NOT need this much grain in their diet. And people wonder why pet obesity is such a problem. LOL

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