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Thread: how long between heat cycles?

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    Default how long between heat cycles?

    I have twenty month old yorkie that came into heat for the first and only time at ten months. The week after her nipples swelled up and disapated. Should I be worried about her? Did she skip a period? Or will she not come into heat again? Is there something that I should be doing for her? Please let me know. I would love to someday see her experience puppies she would make a wonderful mother and I will probably keep all of the pups. That is between me and my grown children. We all love her she has such a gental personality.

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    Senior Member calicokitty's Avatar
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    Dogs are no where as prolific as cats, which cycle every several weeks. Dogs do it usually only every six months.

    The entire "Heat" period lasts an average of 21 days, but this may vary with some dogs.
    The actual "breeding time" is only a matter of 2 or 3 days in the 3 week period, but this time can be very difficult to determine.

    http://www.petbitsforyou.com/heat_cycle.html

  3. #3
    Senior Member BeckyMorgan's Avatar
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    Small dogs may go into heat every four to six months. It's very, very dependent on the dog herself.
    Also, if you're going to breed her, start reading now. There are many things you need to know about tests you'll want to have done on her (to make sure she and the puppies are healthy), selecting a male, what to watch for while she's pregnant...it's a lot of work and there's a whole lot to know.

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    Senior Member GailS's Avatar
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    Hello and welcome to the forum. Why not just get her spayed. She does not need to "experience" puppies, and you risk her life to do so. If your family would like to experience puppies being born and raised, you can volunteer to foster a pregnant dog from a rescue or shelter, there are more than enough to go around, too many, as it is.

    Then you can enjoy your beloved dog for who she is and save some lives at the same time. Win Win.

    Gail

    Quote Originally Posted by BeckyMorgan View Post
    Small dogs may go into heat every four to six months. It's very, very dependent on the dog herself.
    Also, if you're going to breed her, start reading now. There are many things you need to know about tests you'll want to have done on her (to make sure she and the puppies are healthy), selecting a male, what to watch for while she's pregnant...it's a lot of work and there's a whole lot to know.
    Yes, that is true.

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  5. #5
    Staff MaryH's Avatar
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    Hi there!

    Welcome to the forum! Every six months isn't surprising, but for dogs, there's no such thing as a "missed period" - if they don't go into a heat cycle exactly every six months, it could just be that they won't. I've known dogs who went into heat on a yearly basis, no more often than that. It varies by dog.

    With her being so young and so tiny in size, you should probably start doing some research on what health checks are needed to ensure that the dog you select to breed her to is the right one - after all, the owners of the male dog will want those kinds of health checks to ensure that they are breeding their dog to the right female. It goes both ways - health checks now will help you select a good male who will have the temperament you want as well as the healthy body you need to ensure the puppies are the happy, healthy dogs you want. I've known people who skimped on this step, and frankly, paid for it by ending up with a litter of puppies no one would touch (they didn't do sufficient research into the merling gene in coat color, even though they knew about the potential for it - both dogs turned out to have it, resulting in a litter of double-merle dogs, which means the whole group of puppies was likely to end up with serious eye and hearing problems. They didn't research the male's pedigree at all or even their own dog's, which is where they might have been able to find this).

    And you will want to ensure that this is a planned breeding rather than an accidental litter - I was raised with dogs years ago who never were spayed, and some of those accidental litters were dangerous for them due to the size of the male parent and thus the size of the puppies. This is especially important with a dog the size of a yorkie, you'll want to make sure to breed her to a similarly sized dog, if not another yorkie. Your best bet is to start talking to your vet about how to determine when she's likely to go into heat next, and how to check when she's getting close. "She just got outside once" is all it takes!! When they go into heat, they can be determined to find a male. Best to be ready for it!!

    I know we all have lots of cautions and warnings here, but it's because we care about you and your dog, and want you to enjoy her for many years to come. I'd like to hear more about her - there's a couple of yorkie owners around here (and one owner of a yorkie mix -aka the mini wookie). They sound like such wonderful dogs, and they have the sweetest faces!

    I'd love to hear more about your dog!

    -Mary
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