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Thread: Do GloFish breed true?

  1. #1
    Staff - Fishnet Rhodophyta's Avatar
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    Default Do GloFish breed true?

    This is both a legal and a breedng question I guess. Legal, because as far as I know these fish are patented, so no one can breed them without a license from the patent holder. Of course Glofish are zebra danios so there is a 100% chance they will spawn in all but the worst of conditions and if there are plants or some kind of hiding places in the aquarium, zebra fry are almost inevitable.

    The breeding part is that I do see zebra danios that are claimed by their owners to be Glofish offspring, but most don't look a bit like them and resemble normal non-transgenic zebra danios, while a few may show a trace of the red color, but not nearly as intense or as spread as the glowfish that were initially marketed in local fish stores. Do Glofish breed true? Is the red dominant or recessive, or does it take a more complex turn, such as albinism in oscars which displays a gradient from fully pigmented to fully albino?

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    Staff - Fishnet MikeR's Avatar
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    I haven't the foggiest idea if the Glofish would breed true (I haven't seen one, either). It would surprise me if the gene or genes for the color are dominant, but I suppose you could find out by breeding the fish, especially if you bred a Glofish with a standard danio. If the majority of the fry turned out to be Glofish, the gene is dominant. If not, it's not.

    Mike

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    Member KingOfSwords's Avatar
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    Yes, they do breed true. I had some, the fry had the same red glow as the adults. Funny thing with that fish is, the worse you treat them, the more they glow. I had 3-4 fry grow up in a 10 gallon tank with the adults; didn't really want the fish (won them), threw food in when I thought about it, didn't change water for several months, had some Najas in there, it started to fill the tank, pulled some out and saw the fry. I hadn't even cleaned the box filter. Those were the reddest I've ever seen them. The reason they were always so red in stores is because they're usually overcrowded.

    As to whether the characteristic is dominant, I don't know. Never cared enough to test it, there's enough real genetic variation in several species of fish to experiment with, don't need any artificial genes. As MikeR said, it's simple enough to test.
    HAPPINESS may be the door to Heaven,
    but PLEASURE is not the key. - Confucius

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    Its not that you cant breed them. But instead you cannot sell off the offspring.

    Funny thing with that fish is, the worse you treat them, the more they glow.
    That is what they were developed for. To help eaisly find water that is less than desireable in the wild. They are actually set up in labs and water samples are brought in and the fish are kept in the water to do water tests. Kind of odd in my mind though. Do they measure the fish in lumans? LOL
    Dave,
    Im not a true fish doc.

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  5. #5
    Staff - Fishnet Rhodophyta's Avatar
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    They were originally conceived as a money-saving device. Currently, the best bio-assay organism is the daphnia. However, it's drawback is that it requires talent and experience to maintain a daphnia population. Someone who has acquired those abilities can demand higher pay.

    The advantage of the zebrafish is that it can tolerate abysmal treatment. Caring for the zebrafish can be an entry level position, saving water treatment plants and water companies a significant amount of money, and putting people in charge of our drinking water quality and the quality of discaharge water from water treatment systems who are really only qualified to assemble our burgers.

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    If you haven't read up on them you can read up on why they were developed/created from their site. http://www.glofish.com/about.asp
    They have their legal page about breeding here. I was wrong about breeding without selling. I don't know how they could sue you for keeping fish healthy and breeding on their own though.
    http://www.glofish.com/license.htm
    Dave,
    Im not a true fish doc.

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