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Thread: Is Insecticide Harmful To Cats?

  1. #11
    Senior Member calicokitty's Avatar
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    Most of the insecticides are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors [think short circuiting the nerve pathway].

    For humans, the skin is a pretty good barrier, keeping most things out of the body and preventing things from being absorbed through the skin. And, unless you walk barefoot in the grass immediately after application, you are not really going to be exposed to the insecticide. And, even if it gets on your foot, your shower or bath will remove it.

    On the other hand, your pet would get it on it's paws. And how does an animal clean it's paws? By licking, which is ingestion. That makes it a more risky situation for an animal. But, when a spray dries, like inside the house, it is a barrier for the insects, and less likely to get on the paws.

    That said, I believe that less is better. A pointed probe is better in removing weeds than a chemical application. A tall grass actually chokes out weeds.

    I have only rarely had to get after insects inside the house. Several times, I had a severe ant infestation that went after the cat food while it was in their food dish. I scrub the area to remove the scent trail, then treat where I think they are getting in.

    But for those who live in areas that require monthly applications, either by ordinance or policy, I encourage that questions be asked.

    I remember in graduate school; there was some married student housing in WWII quonset huts (and this was long after WWII) that were shared. On one side was a family who felt all life was sacred; my friends shared the other side, and were overrun with roaches. The University was stopped from spraying due to the other side refusing to allow it. If both sides were not sprayed, it would do no good.

  2. #12
    Senior Member midnightblze's Avatar
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    But for those who live in areas that require monthly applications, either by ordinance or policy, I encourage that questions be asked.

    I remember in graduate school; there was some married student housing in WWII quonset huts (and this was long after WWII) that were shared. On one side was a family who felt all life was sacred; my friends shared the other side, and were overrun with roaches. The University was stopped from spraying due to the other side refusing to allow it. If both sides were not sprayed, it would do no good.[/QUOTE]




    The only reason the college could have refused is if the housing was provided free of charge. If there was a monthly rental fee then your friends had every right to demand that the college do something to control the roaches. The all life is sacred fanatics should not have been allowed to control the living space of anyone else in the building.

  3. #13
    Senior Member ZooGirl02's Avatar
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    Unfortunately it is required that they spray monthly in our apartments to prevent bug infestations. I have never had a bug infestation here and neither has anyone else in our apartment that I know of except for flea problems. A few other apartments have had problems with fleas and I had a mild outbreak of them here in my apartment once but after the guy came to spray, they were gone. I am really quite thankful that they spray as I absolutely cannot stand bugs in my apartment! However, I would feel better if I knew that the spray they use wasn't harmful. I am not going to stop at asking the company if its harmful but will actually ask for the active ingredient so I can know myself because no offense to any bug exterminators but I don't trust the company to tell the truth. If they think that someone might quit allowing them to use their cheapest spray or whatever because of its harmful effects on pets then they're probably going to shy away from telling you about the harmful effects so they can save money. Well, I need to go! Later!

  4. #14
    Senior Member midnightblze's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZooGirl02
    Unfortunately it is required that they spray monthly in our apartments to prevent bug infestations. I have never had a bug infestation here and neither has anyone else in our apartment that I know of except for flea problems. A few other apartments have had problems with fleas and I had a mild outbreak of them here in my apartment once but after the guy came to spray, they were gone. I am really quite thankful that they spray as I absolutely cannot stand bugs in my apartment! However, I would feel better if I knew that the spray they use wasn't harmful. I am not going to stop at asking the company if its harmful but will actually ask for the active ingredient so I can know myself because no offense to any bug exterminators but I don't trust the company to tell the truth. If they think that someone might quit allowing them to use their cheapest spray or whatever because of its harmful effects on pets then they're probably going to shy away from telling you about the harmful effects so they can save money. Well, I need to go! Later!

    Good idea to ask about the ingredients. I'd be very suprised if they don't respond with appropriate information. You do have the right to know what is being used in your living space. If it is a matter of required treatment for roaches you could try asking for baited control instead of spraying. Worked very well when the little buggers started up in my house about five years ago.

  5. #15
    Senior Member ZooGirl02's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by midnightblze
    Good idea to ask about the ingredients. I'd be very suprised if they don't respond with appropriate information. You do have the right to know what is being used in your living space. If it is a matter of required treatment for roaches you could try asking for baited control instead of spraying. Worked very well when the little buggers started up in my house about five years ago.
    Yeah I probably should be more trusting. I should not assume bad things about people. I feel it is best to always assume the best.

    Anyway, I do not have any required treatment for anything as I do not have any bug infestations at all. Our apartments have been very good at not getting infestations as far as I know.

  6. #16
    Senior Member midnightblze's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZooGirl02
    Yeah I probably should be more trusting. I should not assume bad things about people. I feel it is best to always assume the best.

    Anyway, I do not have any required treatment for anything as I do not have any bug infestations at all. Our apartments have been very good at not getting infestations as far as I know.

    Has nothing to do with being trusting at all. You live there. You have a right to know the ingredients of what is being sprayed in your home. And it also has nothing to do with assuming the worst either. You could have allergies that will flare up or worsen. You are just doing what you need to do for your safety.

    One of the reasons your complex hasn't had problems is the monthly control. I lived in an apartment in NJ thirty years ago that sprayed monthy too. They put a notice in your maibox and asked for all pets to be crated. The crating was a requirement. Not to keep the animals from being sprayed. But to keep them from getting out of the apartment. Seems the complex was sued by a tenant when her bird flew out the door and got away.

    They also had a provision in the notice for alternative treatment, baiting. Roach Motels for lack of a better term. I do not know where you live. Some areas of the country no matter how spic and span your home roaches are a fact of life. They will get in no matter what you try to do to prevent them. We even have a lovely species of flying roach here in SC. So they don't always crawl and sneak in through the cracks in the door.

  7. #17
    Senior Member calicokitty's Avatar
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    The only reason the college could have refused is if the housing was provided free of charge. If there was a monthly rental fee then your friends had every right to demand that the college do something to control the roaches. The all life is sacred fanatics should not have been allowed to control the living space of anyone else in the building.

    The housing was not free ($35/month) but there were two families splitting a hut, and I knew the persons in the other half, and they told me the University would not spray because of the other persons. It was a religious issue, so that can complicate things.

  8. #18
    Senior Member midnightblze's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by calicokitty
    The only reason the college could have refused is if the housing was provided free of charge. If there was a monthly rental fee then your friends had every right to demand that the college do something to control the roaches. The all life is sacred fanatics should not have been allowed to control the living space of anyone else in the building.

    The housing was not free ($35/month) but there were two families splitting a hut, and I knew the persons in the other half, and they told me the University would not spray because of the other persons. It was a religious issue, so that can complicate things.

    Religious issues can cause problems. If the kitchen and bath areas were shared then I can see the point. Married living quarters doesn't seem to me to be anything but seperate living quarters. You have your livingroom, bedroom, kitchen and bath. They have theirs. But to me, if the housing was not communal then the religious restrictions ended at the respective doorways. No one has a right to come into your home and force you to live by their religious views.

    There are literally dozens upon dozens of situations where I doubt the university would have allowed one religion to control the living space of another couple.
    I've run into a particularly nasty sect of voodoo cultist. They practice ritual sacrifice of small animals. What would the university have done if they occupied one half of the hut? Their religious views after all require animal sacrifice to their dieties. I think the university failed your friends.

  9. #19
    Senior Member calicokitty's Avatar
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    Well, the key here is that the quarters were built in WWII for temporary housing, and were still in use during the 1970's. Think decrepit, and they were divided in half. You can expect there was an easy route for vermin between the partitions. You can try and control your area, but behind the partition was a ready supply of insects ready to re-enter your quarters. Ugh!

  10. #20
    Senior Member midnightblze's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by calicokitty
    Well, the key here is that the quarters were built in WWII for temporary housing, and were still in use during the 1970's. Think decrepit, and they were divided in half. You can expect there was an easy route for vermin between the partitions. You can try and control your area, but behind the partition was a ready supply of insects ready to re-enter your quarters. Ugh!


    My impression of the problem was the refusal of the university to do anything about the problem because of the religious views of one couple. It was my understanding that the university did not spray in your friend's quarters also.
    Because the other couple refused to allow it. If that is wrong then I apologize for the misunderstanding.


    Oh I know about those huts. Spent a few months in them during my time on active duty in the early seventies. You can still find a few in use as barns and other outbuildings on farms. They were easy to take down and cheap to move.
    I live in Charleston, SC. Near a swamp and it is almost a sub-tropical climate. The beasties are near impossible to completely prevent their entry. But you can control the flood of bugs to a mere one or two now and then. I do not use spray for roach control. There is a very good bait to use for that. Ants have to be sprayed for. They live in the walls and the common ants around here are as destructive to homes as termites.

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